Questions about Silk (Part 2 of 2)

Posted: 27 February 2015 at 6 a.m.

Superior Silk

Silk is a fiber which connotes luxurious sheets, deep colors, and finesse. In the thread world, Silk is treated as the ultimate delicacy for applique, clothing construction, and quilting. Silk offers durability and long-lasting strength combined with lint-free luxury.  This gorgeous fiber may be intimidating for first time users, which is why today we are answering several of the most common questions we receive about our silk threads.

Q. What is the difference between filament and spun silk?
A.  Filament silk thread is made from a continuous strand of silk which is twisted together to create the final sewing thread. The silk cocoon is unwound to form one long continuous fiber and then tightly wound around itself to create a multi-filament silk thread.  Spun silk thread consists of "tails" or sections of the silk fiber which were broken from the single continuous filament fiber and then spun together.  Filament silk is the premium silk. (All of our silk lines are filament silk)

Q. Are Superior's Silk Threads machine washable?
A. Yes! Our Silk threads are colorfast. They will retain their color and not bleed when washed with proper care.

Q. Because #100 Silk is a very fine thread, will it break in my sewing machine?
A.  If you are using the proper needle (we recommend our Topstitch #70/10) needle and have adjusted your tension accordingly, it will work wonderfully. We are able to successfully sew with our Kimono Silk thread in our large collection of home sewing machines and all major longarm machines. For a guide on tension settings and proper needle sizes, please view our Reference Guides.

Q.  Can I use silk threads on my long arm?
A.  Absolutely!  Many quilters love to use our #100 Kimono Silk.  This extremely fine thread blends incredibly with fabric, adding texture to any design.  You can see a beautiful example of this in On This Winter Day.

Q.  When I use silk, should I use it on the top and bottom?
A.  Choosing top and bobbin thread is determined by your project, the desired end look, and user preference.  If you prefer to have silk on top and bottom, go for it!  Otherwise you can mix fiber types and use either a cotton thread, like MasterPiece or a polyester thread, like Bottom Line.

If you haven’t used silk on a project yet, we encourage you to try it!

Do you have other questions about silk?  Please let us know, we’re happy to answer!

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